Winter burn has many Pine trees appearing sick.



Perhaps you have noticed many pine trees in our area with brown or straw like needles.  This issue was caused by an extreme temperature swing last October (before the trees were dormant for the winter). If you have a tree with these brown needles don't fret just yet!


The Colorado State Forest service recently recently explained "the buds on these frost-injured trees may have survived, and they may produce new growth this spring”.


"Damaged pine trees may appear grizzled and possess white or straw-colored foliage, referred to as winter burn. While most sightings of pines exhibiting these frost-damage symptoms have occurred in Black Forest, trees in other areas may be experiencing this damage as well."



Read the full article here.



It may seem odd to water plants during the freezing winter months, but overly dry trees can become highly susceptible to root and branch die-off, as well as more prone to insects and diseases. The best time for winter watering are days when the snow has melted off a bit and the temperature is above 40 degrees.


"The best time for winter watering are days when the snow has melted off a bit and the temperature is above 40 degrees."

Locally Owned and Operated - Serving Castle Rock, Castle Pines, Parker and surrounding communities.
720-600-2682